Ham radio Hurricane Net Frequencies

Do you want to know how and where to listen in on the Hurricane Watch Net? This video shows you the various frequencies you can tune to on your ham or shortwave radio to listen in on hurricane net operations.

The Hurricane Watch Net has been in continuous operation since 5:00 PM EDT – 2100 UTC Saturday afternoon and will remain in operation until further notice. Hurricane Dorian made landfall at 12:40 pm EDT (1640 UTC) in Elbow Cay, Abacos. The winds were 185 mph, gusts in excess of 220 mph, with a minimum central pressure of 911 Mb (26.90 inches). Dorian is now the strongest Hurricane in modern records for the northwestern Bahamas. Although Dorian remains forecasted to make a turn to the north and track parallel to the coast of Florida and Georgia, that turn isn’t expected until sometime late Monday. The current forecast has tropical-storm-force winds along the coast if the track parallels the coast with hurricane-force winds just offshore. For now, HWN will continue operations as though Dorian will make Florida landfall. If Dorian were to hit Florida as a Cat 5 and at the strength it is now, sustained winds of 185 mph, it would the strongest hurricane to hit Florida since Andrew in 1992.

Hurricane Net Frequencies

https://youtu.be/TKodG8L5ohI

A reminder to those in the affected area of Hurricane Dorian, should you find yourself in the eye of the storm, PLEASE resist the urge to venture outside. There may be downed power lines and they should be considered “LIVE”. Furthermore, you do not know when the backside of the eye will come. The winds WILL NOT slowly increase in speed but rather go from zero to full speed nearly instantly. It is not worth getting hurt or worse.

Hurricane Net Frequencies

Please, wait until the storm has passed before venturing outside. And again, please consider any downed power lines as being alive! On behalf of the Management and Net Members of the Hurricane Watch Net, our sincere thanks to everyone who uses 14.325 MHz and 7.268 MHz for various nets and rag-chews to allow us to use the frequency. Having a clear frequency certainly makes our job easier, and we know those in the affected area greatly appreciate it as well!

1 thought on “Ham radio Hurricane Net Frequencies”

  1. QST de W1AW ARRL Bulletin 34 ARLB034

    From ARRL Headquarters Newington CT November 17, 2020 To all radio amateurs SB QST ARL ARLB034 ARLB034 Clear Frequencies Requested for Caribbean Hurricane Emergency Traffic

    Stations handling emergency traffic during the response to Category 5 Hurricane Iota, just off the eastern coast of Nicaragua, are requesting clear frequencies.

    Radio amateurs not involved in the emergency response are asked to avoid (plus/minus 5 KHz) the Hurricane Watch Net (HWN) and WX4NHC (National Hurricane Center) frequencies of 14.325 and 7.268 MHz, as well as a Honduran emergency net operation on 7.180 MHz (net control station is HR1JFA), and a Nicaraguan emergency net operating on 7.098 MHz.

    With maximum sustained winds of 160 MPH, Hurricane Iota is expected to bring catastrophic winds, life-threatening storm surge, and torrential rainfall to Central America.

    NNNN /EX

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